Reviews Just In.... rEvolver Fest

It’s day four of rEvolver Fest and six shows have already opened with more openings to check out this weekend.

Here’s what the critics are saying….

Lady Parts

Deb Williams, Alison Kelly, Katey Hoffman and Cheyenne Mabberley. Photo by Mark Halliday

Deb Williams, Alison Kelly, Katey Hoffman and Cheyenne Mabberley. Photo by Mark Halliday

Lady Parts: I like ’em

Colin Thomas

Lady Parts is a feminist revue that includes sketch comedy, personal testimony, and a whole lot of political fuck-you-ness. It’s hilarious, it’s necessary, and it’s so welcome…. With all the shit that’s going down these days — especially the shit about abortion, both here and in the States — it’s a relief to sit in the sanity and fury of Lady Parts for an hour and a half, and to share the release with an audience of like-minded (not-crazy) people.”


my dear Lewis

Photo by Lucas Saugen

Photo by Lucas Saugen

At rEvolver Festival, my dear Lewis explores puppetry as playful as it is mysterious

The Georgia Straight

“Loven’s creativity is breathtaking, as is his precision and the intimacy of his craft. Everything happening on-stage is physically small—mostly hand-sized puppets, a marionette that is maybe the length of Loven’s forearm, a small shadow-puppet scene on rectangles of paper—but the emotional scope aims to fill up the room… Loven’s fascinating skill with puppetry and mixed-media storytelling, and the DIY aesthetic he adheres to so charmingly and responsibly. There aren’t a lot of fancy materials at work here, and this kind of accessibility is thrilling to witness.”


Other Inland Empires

Stephanie Wong, photo by Tim Matheson

Stephanie Wong, photo by Tim Matheson

From surfing to Jewish history, Other Inland Empires rides a lot of waves at the rEvolver Festival

The Georgia Straight

“There’s a lot to appreciate about Julie Hammond’s Other Inland Empires. It’s an ambitious …. mix of surf and SoCal historical pop culture, semiautobiographical travelogue, and first-person audio testimonial from Hammond’s own grandmother recounting her experience as a little girl in a concentration camp. Interspersed throughout its 65-minute runtime are covers of classic California songs by bands like the Beach Boys and the Mamas and the Papas.

Hearing Grandma recount the harrowing details of her youth is something I’m never going to forget, and I’ll be grateful to Hammond and her grandmother forever for sharing her story. It’s just Grandma’s voice coming through the loudspeaker, and the laid-back bustle on-stage (there are a lot of moving props and scenes, like inflatable palm trees and beach chairs and blankets, that are set up and struck within minutes) fades away, and we just listen. It’s perfect.”


Other Inland Empires: surfing in shallow water

Colin Thomas

Off the top, Other Inland Empires is seductive. One of the members of the artistic team pours sand from a beach cooler onto the top of another beach cooler. This action is a sensual evocation of the shore, and the pouring takes a while, so it’s also an invitation to allow one’s self to become meditative.

The brightly coloured elements in Robert Leveroos’s set feel innocent and elemental: the green screen, the bright orange beach chair, the blue fabric poured on the floor.

There’s playfulness, too. You can almost smell the soft plastic of the inflatable palm trees. Actors set up a fan and spray water into it to create mist. The green screen moves as if of its own accord and, in a charmingly low-tech kind of magic, you never know what props are going to emerge from behind it.